Healthy Feet: 7 Tips For Summer

Memorial Day is around the corner, and sandals are making their official 2012 debut.

And for many of us, that means retreating from a long, punishing winter spent stuffed into boots. Yup, it’s feet season.

In that spirit, we rounded up seven expert tips for keeping your feet healthy all summer long. Go ahead, put your best foot forward.

Sunscreen Guide: What To Wear, When And Why

Memorial Day rings in the summer season and, along with barbecue equipment, beach toys and sandals, stores are beginning to pad their shelves with sunscreen. That’s a great thing: sun damage is responsible for 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers in the United States, itself the most common form of cancer in the country, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. In fact, more than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.

“The risk of skin cancer is very real,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said in a recent statement in support of the government’s first annual “Don’t Fry Day” on May 25. “The FDA strongly recommends that consumers regularly use a Broad Spectrum sunscreen with an SPF value of 15 or higher in combination with other protective measures to more effectively protect themselves and their families whenever they are in the sun.”

But with so many options on store shelves — not to mention an impending change in the way that sunscreens are labelled and rated — selecting the appropriate sun protection can be a confusing endeavour. On the one hand, the block is essential to prevent the skin’s absorption of damaging sun radiation that can cause free-radical damage and lead to skin cancer and premature aging. But new research has suggested that some chemicals found in leading sunscreen brands can actually increase the risk of some melanoma skin cancers. So what should you do?

Perfect Prom Hairstyles in 4 Easy Steps

Don’t wait until the last minute to decide how you will wear your hair for prom. Your hairstyle is an important part of your overall look and should be planned and tested. Follow these four easy steps for getting the perfect prom hair style.

Step 1: Buy or pick out the type of dress you will wear. The dress must be coordinated with your hairstyle. For example, if you have a fancy, elaborate dress, you might want to go with a simple, sophisticated hairstyle. A fancy dress combined with a fancy updo might be too much ‘fancy’.

Step 2: Search for pictures of hairstyles that you like. Find 3-4 pictures of styles that you like and make copies of them to bring to your stylist. A picture is the best way to let your stylist know exactly what style you want. Best places to search prom hairstyles are websites and women fashion and beauty magazines.

Step 3: Try it on. There are several online programs that allow you to try on a particular hairstyle. This is the fastest way to see if you like a particular hairstyle. Find programs by searching for ‘try on hairstyles’. Many of these programs will help you to upload your own photo, determine your face shape and select suitable hairstyles to try on.

Step 4: Schedule your appointment at the salon. Many salons book prom hair style appointments weeks if not months in advance. Don’t be caught without an appointment call early.

Be As Strong As a Soldier

The M4 carbine’s metal ridges feel cool against my hands. Four magazines bounce around my waist on an ammo vest as I sprint over dying grass and dirt kicked up by a squad of soldiers before me. I drop to my left knee, eject one magazine, pull out another and slam it in with my palm, then run. Finally, my chance to live what I dreamed of a hundred times. But as I cross the finish line, something separates me from the soldiers more than enlistment papers or tactical knowledge: I am not Army strong.

Train for the Battlefield

In July, I was a guest at physical training, or PT, with a company of Army Pathfinders from the 10th Mountain Division’s Task Force Knighthawks stationed at Fort Drum, New York. To prepare for my morning with the troops, I maintained a loose workout schedule for three weeks. Five miles here, two there. Pushups and situps once in a while. Drink more water than beer. (Is your drink making you fat? Lose up to 32 pounds this year just by switching your beer, coffee, and juice.  Discover the secret in Drink This, Not That!

Dew clung to my Chevy Cobalt as I passed through the post’s gates and into the public affairs parking lot at 6:30 that morning. I pulled a camouflage uniform over my head and looked in the bathroom mirror. My grandfather still tells me stories about World War II and his time at Fort Drum. Growing up, I pretended so many times that I had this uniform, and now I did—I looked like a soldier. But as I walked to the training field, officers standing in the cool morning air looked twice and grinned at me as if to say, “You have no idea what you’re getting into, you dope.”

As I crossed over a dry ditch to the PT field, Lt. Col. Matthew Braman, who commands hundreds of soldiers at Fort Drum, nodded at my green notebook. Smirking, he asked, “Are you running or writing?”

In the last days of my master’s program at Syracuse University, an Army lieutenant told my professors that any journalist interested in military reporting could come to Fort Drum three weeks later to experience training firsthand. My eyes popped and I told everyone I knew that I was going. After reporting military stories all year, I would finally stand with soldiers, immersing myself in a taste of their daily lives.